Orioles have deal in place for Manny Machado, working through trade specifics

ESPN News Services

The Baltimore Orioles have the structure of a deal in place for Manny Machado and are working through specific aspects of a trade, sources told ESPN’s Buster Olney.

As Machado prepares for Tuesday night’s All-Star Game in what could be his final appearance in a Baltimore uniform, the Orioles were going through medical records and other paperwork involved in the transaction, sources told Olney.

It is not yet known which team Machado will be traded to, but the Los Angeles Dodgers and Philadelphia Phillies have been invested in their pursuit of the All-Star shortstop.

Fancred reported earlier Tuesday that the Dodgers had emerged as the leading contender to acquire Machado but also noted that the talks were fluid and identified the Phillies, Milwaukee Brewers and Arizona Diamondbacks as contenders with an “outside chance” to land the four-time All-Star.

MLB.com reported Monday night, however, that Philadelphia was the “most likely destination” for Machado because of the Phillies’ willingness to include pitching prospect Adonis Medina. MASN Sports was first to report Monday that the Orioles were very close to a Machado trade.

As rumors swirled about his imminent departure from the Orioles, Machado addressed the media Monday, acknowledging it would feel different to play for another team.

“The only thing I’ve ever known has been the Orioles organization,” he said. “They drafted me, I came up with them, played with them. So I don’t know anything different.”

Olney reported Sunday that even if the Phillies do not trade for Machado this summer, they would ardently pursue him as a free agent after the season. Philadelphia’s front office is loaded with former Orioles officials who were involved in the drafting and developing of Machado — including president Andy MacPhail, general manager Matt Klentak and assistant GM Ned Rice.

According to Olney, the Phillies prospects being evaluated by the Orioles were Medina, pitcher Franklyn Kilome, outfielder Jhailyn Ortiz and infielder Arquimedes Gamboa.

Machado, 26, was drafted by the Orioles with the No. 3 pick in 2010 and has been a starter in Baltimore since 2012. His contract expires after this season, and the Orioles aren’t in a position to match the offers the four-time All-Star is expected to receive on the open market.

Machado insists he’s not thinking about whether Tuesday night might be his last in Orioles attire.

“No, no. I’m putting it on and I’m going to represent the organization in the right way,” he said Monday. “If it is, it is. If not, I’ll be there on Friday [in Toronto], back with my teammates.”

Machado would be a solid addition to any contender. He converted from third base to shortstop this season and has played the position well enough to easily win the All-Star fan vote at the position.

“People didn’t think I should have made the move in my walk year, but I did. I’m going to the All-Star Game as an Oriole and as a shortstop,” Machado said.

By far the best performer on a last-place team, Machado leads the Orioles in batting average (.315), home runs (24), RBIs (65) and walks (45).

“We’ll see where he ends up in the next week or two,” Milwaukee outfielder Christian Yelich said. “I know we’re one of the teams rumored to be in to get him.”

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

Photo: John Minchillo/AP Photo

Milwaukee’s Aguilar wins NL All-Star Final Vote

ESPN News Services

Jean Segura and Jesus Aguilar are headed to the All-Star Game.

The Seattle Mariners shortstop and Milwaukee Brewers first baseman won the online fan votes for the 32nd and final roster spots on the American League and National League teams, respectively.

“It was unbelievable,” Segura said. “I can’t believe all those people around the world, the fans, the marketing, the organization, the people in Seattle, my teammates, even Felix [Hernandez] yesterday going around the city trying to get some votes for me. It just feels amazing. It feels special. You come from another country and you see how the people support you around the world, it makes it even more special.”

Aguilar, 28, drew 20.2 million votes to secure his first All-Star selection. His total was the second-highest in the history of the All-Star Final Vote, trailing only Los Angeles Dodgers slugger Justin Turner’s 20.8 million votes last year.

The Venezuelan was tied for the National League lead with 23 home runs and becomes the fourth Milwaukee player headed to the game.

“The campaign was unbelievable — the people in Wisconsin and around the world really supported me,” Aguilar said. “It’s a great thing.”

Brewers outfielders Lorenzo Cain and Christian Yelich had already been chosen, along with reliever Josh Hader.

Aguilar has 67 RBIs, including 12 in his past seven games, and is batting .307.

“I’m swinging really good right now,” he said.

San Francisco Giants first baseman Brandon Belt finished second in the NL balloting, followed by Max Muncy of the Dodgers, Trea Turner of the Washington Nationals and Matt Carpenter of the St. Louis Cardinals.

Belt thanked the fans, his teammates and San Francisco’s social media crew for the efforts to get him in the All-Star Game.

“I was told Russia actually interfered with this election,” Belt quipped.

Segura, 28, snagged the last AL spot with 13.6 million votes. He was followed by Boston Red Sox outfielder Andrew Benintendi, New York Yankees slugger Giancarlo Stanton, Minnesota Twins outfielder Eddie Rosario and Angels shortstop Andrelton Simmons.

The Seattle shortstop was batting .329 and ranked second in the majors with 116 hits. He will join Mariners teammates Nelson Cruz, Edwin Diaz and Mitch Haniger at the All-Star Game. Segura, who made the NL All-Star squad in 2013 with Milwaukee, is the first Seattle player to win the fan voting for the final spot.

The 89th All-Star Game will be held Tuesday at Nationals Park in Washington.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Photo: Jeff Hanisch/USA TODAY Sports

http://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/24071912/2018-all-star-final-vote-winners-jesus-aguilar-milwaukee-brewers-jean-segura-seattle-mariners

Bosio claims misunderstanding in firing, Stumpf denies nickname

By Blake Froling

*UPDATED 1:24 p.m.*

According to a new report from The Athletic, four team sources confirmed that Bosio directed the term “monkey” at an African-American clubhouse attendant, which precipitated his firing.

During this exchange, Bosio made a derogatory comment about one of the Tigers pitchers and then gestured toward the attendant before adding, “like this monkey here,” the sources said. The attendant pushed back at Bosio for the comment, and an additional team employee witnessed the exchange. Bosio was provided an opportunity to apologize to the attendant after his outburst but declined to do so, according to multiple sources.


Everyone has been wondering what former Tigers pitching coach Chris Bosio allegedly said to a team employee that was bad enough to get him fired on Wednesday. Now we know. Kind of.

Kim Klement/USA TODAY Sports

Bosio spoke with Bob Nightengale of USA Today to give his side of the story and clear up what he called a “misunderstanding.” He said he was referring to Tigers pitcher Daniel Stumpf, not a clubhouse attendant:

“Someone in our coaches’ room asked me (Monday afternoon) about Stumpf,’’ Bosio said. “And I said, “Oh, you mean, ‘Spider Monkey.’ That’s his nickname. He’s a skinny little white kid who makes all of these funny faces when he works out.

“The kid thought we were talking about him. He got all upset. He assumed we were talking about him. I said, “No, no, no. We’re talking about Stumpf.’

“And that was it. I swear on my mom and dad’s graves, there was nothing else to it.’’

After the story came out, Stumpf told the Detroit Free Press on Thursday night that he has never heard that nickname for himself:

“Spider Monkey is not a nickname I have been called or I’m familiar with.”

Bosio told Nightengale that he plans to hire an attorney and will consider filing a wrongful termination suit against the Tigers. With this incident damaging his reputation, he may become untouchable in baseball for quite a while.

If it turns out Bosio’s story is actually true, then general manager Al Avila and the Tigers will look like they acted too quickly and without all the facts. But with Stumpf denying that anyone calls him “spider monkey,” that seems unlikely at this point.

Bullpen coach Rick Anderson will assume Bosio’s former job as pitching coach for the remainder of the season.

Real or not? The Brewers need to trade for Jacob deGrom

David Schoenfield
ESPN Senior Writer

The Milwaukee Brewers should go all-in and trade for Jacob deGrom.

The Brewers have made the playoffs four times in their history. It’s interesting to note that in each of those years, they made a big trade for a pitcher:

• In 2011, they acquired Zack Greinke before the season for Lorenzo Cain, Alcides Escobar, Jake Odorizzi and Jeremy Jeffress. Greinke went 16-6 as the Brewers won 96 games and the NL Central.

• In 2008, they acquired CC Sabathia on July 7. He went 11-2 with a 1.65 ERA in 17 starts, threw seven complete games and memorably carried the Brewers to the wild card by starting three times on three days’ rest the final nine days of the season.

• In 1982, they acquired Don Sutton on Aug. 30 and he went 4-1 in seven starts, including beating the Orioles on the final day of the season as the Brewers won the AL East by one game over Baltimore.

• In 1981, they acquired Rollie Fingers in the offseason, and he went on to win Cy Young and MVP honors as the team’s closer.

In those rare seasons when the Brewers have chased a playoff spot, seizing the moment has been their defining characteristic. The Brewers lead the Cubs in the NL Central. The Cubs are still the division favorites, but the Brewers are a good team. They have a dominant bullpen led by the unhittable Josh Hader. The lineup has a couple of holes and is only middle of the pack in the NL, but the Brewers lead the majors in defensive runs saved. The rotation is solid but unspectacular, ranking 13th in the majors in ERA. What the rotation needs is an ace. It needs Jacob deGrom.

Todd Kirkland/AP Photo

The Mets’ season is over. They’re 13 games under .500, and their lineup on Tuesday included an LOL defense of Jose Reyes at short, Asdrubal Cabrera at second, Dominic Smith in left and Jose Bautista in right. It isn’t certain that the Mets should trade deGrom, let alone that they will, especially given that he’s under team control through 2020. The announcement Tuesday that GM Sandy Alderson is taking a leave of absence for cancer treatment and that his tenure as GM is probably over only complicates the direction of the club.

Do the Brewers have the young talent to acquire deGrom? It probably would take a package that exceeds even what they gave up for Greinke, who had two seasons of team control. Their top prospect is bat-first second baseman Keston Hiura, who is hitting .331/.389/.537 in the minors, including .358 in 21 games at Double-A. Corbin Burnes is the team’s top pitching prospect, and he has a 4.93 ERA at Triple-A Colorado Springs, with more K’s than innings, and I’d look at that more than a high ERA at Colorado Springs.

You start with those two. The Brewers have a glut of outfielders. Domingo Santana hit 30 home runs last year and has been sent back to Triple-A to find his stroke and get some playing time. The Mets have their own glut of outfielders, but you can sort all that out later. Maybe you throw in Freddy Peralta, the undersized right-hander with the big numbers at Triple-A and a couple of impressive outings in the majors, including seven scoreless innings with 10 strikeouts and one hit on Tuesday against the Royals (though he probably faced better lineups at Colorado Springs). Is that enough? Hiura, Burnes, Santana and Peralta for deGrom? Maybe you get the Mets to include Cabrera, who would provide an offensive upgrade at second base.

The Cubs are vulnerable. The Brewers can win this thing. It isn’t likely that they can ever sign an ace, since they’ll lose every bidding war. They have to trade for one.

More: http://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/23919537/real-not-brewers-need-trade-jacob-degrom

Tigers pitching coach Chris Bosio fired for ‘insensitive comments’

By Blake Froling

Detroit Tigers pitching coach Chris Bosio was fired this afternoon for “insensitive comments,” according to the team. General manager Al Avila said that bullpen coach Rick Anderson will replace Bosio for the rest of the season.

The Tigers also released a statement:

Effective immediately, the Detroit Tigers have terminated the contract of pitching coach Chris Bosio for his insensitive comments that violated Club policy and his Uniform Employee Contract. The organization holds all of our personnel to the highest standards of personal conduct both on and off the field. We have zero tolerance for this type of behavior. The Club will have no further comment on this matter.

The Tigers did not specify what Bosio said that prompted his firing. Bosio was brought onto the Tigers staff this winter by new manager Ron Gardenhire after he was fired by the Chicago Cubs.

Brewers recall Brad Miller, send down struggling Domingo Santana

Associated Press

MILWAUKEE — The Milwaukee Brewers recalled veteran infielder Brad Miller from Triple-A Colorado Springs on Saturday and optioned struggling outfielder Domingo Santana there in an exchange of former 30-homer players.

Miller, acquired from Tampa Bay on June 10 for first baseman-outfielder Ji-Man Choi, was in the Brewers’ starting lineup at second base and batting sixth Saturday against St. Louis.

Jeff Roberson/AP Photo

“That first day, no matter how much sleep you have, no matter the travel, it doesn’t really matter, you’re running on adrenaline,” Miller said before the game. “Excited to get in there right away and get to work.”

Santana hit .278 last season for Milwaukee with 30 homers and 85 RBI, but never got going this season. He hit .249 and just three homers and 17 RBI in 189 at-bats.

“At some point, we’re going to need Domingo and we’d prefer that he was kind of rolling and clicking when that times comes,” manager Craig Counsell said.

“It’s tough to do it when you’re not playing that much. It’s not something that you want to have to do, and he was a big part of our success last year. But, we just need to get him going and the best way to do that is have him playing,” he said.

With Jesus Aguilar and his team-best 16 homers earning more time at first base, recently activated Eric Thames has been playing more outfield, reducing Santana’s role.

The 28-year-old Miller batted .256 with five homers and 21 RBI in 48 games this season with Tampa Bay. Miller hit .243 with 30 homers and 81 RBI for the Rays in 2016, but dipped to .201 with nine homers and 40 RBI last season.

“Each year is different and you kind of go with the ebbs and flows — but I think just being in this environment and in this culture they’ve created here, it seems pretty positive for everybody involved,” Miller said.

Miller has started at seven different positions in the majors. He played 105 games at shortstop with Tampa Bay in 2016, then 98 games at second base with the Rays last season. This year, he played 35 games at first and six at second with Tampa Bay.

“What we may ask of him is to move around the field more regularly at different positions on a daily basis, whether it be double switches late in the game or in a starting role,” Counsell said. “But, he is versatile, he’s a pretty good athlete. He has done this all before, it’s just kind of getting him comfortable with doing it again.”

http://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/23887041/milwaukee-brewers-recall-brad-miller-send-struggling-domingo-santana

Interview: Emily Waldon, Tigers minor league reporter for The Athletic, June 19, 2018

0:00-0:38 – Most attention ever for Tigers farm system
0:39-1:41 – How improved farm system is from four years ago
1:42-2:50 – Biggest positional weaknesses
2:51-4:04 – ETA for Christin Stewart
4:05-5:05 – How long of leash does JaCoby Jones have?
5:06-6:19 – Casey Mize timetable
6:20-7:08 – Does Mize project as ace?
7:09-8:49 – Under the radar draft pick
8:50-9:59 – Competition difference between college ball and minors
10:00-11:06 – Does Tigers quick start affect rebuilding plans?
11:07-12:07 – Most valuable trade pieces
12:08-13:10 – Buyers or sellers market at the trade deadline?
13:11-14:25 – When can Tigers become contenders again?

Brewers pitcher vomits twice, finishes inning

ESPN News Services

Milwaukee Brewers reliever Adrian Houser made it through the top of the eighth inning of a 10-9 loss to the Philadelphia Phillies on Sunday despite vomiting twice during the inning.

The right-hander, who was called on to pitch in the inning with the Brewers trailing 8-5, first vomited behind the mound after finishing his warm-up tosses. Manager Craig Counsell came out to the mound and gave the pitcher a bottle of water while the grounds crew came on to clean up the spot. He then threw a few more warm-up tosses and remained in the game. He allowed a double to Phillies catcher Jorge Alfaro to open the inning and then got pinch hitter Jesmuel Valentin to ground out before vomiting a second time.

Benny Sieu-USA TODAY Sports

Counsell came back out of the dugout to check on Houser again, but the pitcher was able to remain in the game. He allowed a run-scoring double by shortstop Scott Kingery but then got second baseman Cesar Hernandez to fly out and left fielder Rhys Hoskins to ground out.

The Brewers were not charged with mound visits when Counsell checked on his pitcher, umpire Laz Diaz indicated on the field.

“For Adrian today, it was just kind of a combination of a bunch of factors. He wasn’t under the weather at all, but it was an early wake-up call, not enough food, heat, probably a little nerves from getting to the big leagues today,” Counsell said.

“There wasn’t very much coming out. It wasn’t a food thing,” he said with a chuckle.

Counsell, who played 16 seasons in the majors and has been the Brewers’ manager since 2015, said this was the first time he saw a pitcher vomit while on the mound. He said he wasn’t worried about Houser’s safety.

“Adrian was completely fine,” Counsell said. “It was like he was just trying to get that part over with. There was no panic in his eyes, not in any way. He was talking and he wasn’t struggling at all. Like I said, it was just a kind of combination of all those factors. He was fine, kind of after he sat down and everything was good.”

This was just Houser’s fifth major league appearance. He had made two appearances for the Brewers in 2015 and two this season before Sunday.

“I think it was a combination of traveling this morning and not having a lot of food in me. I was trying to stay hydrated in the bullpen. It’s pretty hot here compared to Colorado Springs. All combined, it got me,” Houser said.

Houser’s willingness to stay in the game impressed Phillies manager Gabe Kapler.

“I have a lot of respect for anybody who would step behind the mound and throw up and step back on the mound and pitch,” he said.

Houser was recalled from Triple-A Colorado Springs earlier Sunday. The Brewers optioned right-hander Jorge Lopez to Colorado Springs in a corresponding move.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

http://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/23824206/adrian-houser-milwaukee-brewers-vomits-twice-finishes-inning

Real or Not? Miggy might never dominate at the plate again

David Schoenfield
ESPN Senior Writer

Miguel Cabrera is an all-time great, one of the most lethal right-handed batters ever with four batting titles, two home run championships and a Triple Crown season. You have to wonder, however, if we’ll ever see Super Scary Miggy again.

Cabrera ruptured a biceps tendon on a swing in Tuesday’s 6-4 loss to the Twins and he’ll require season-ending surgery. His season is over after 38 games and only three home runs. Once one of the iron men of the game, Cabrera averaged 157 games per season from 2004 to 2014 without landing on the DL. But check out his list of injuries since 2014:

• 2014: Played 159 games and hit .313 with 25 home runs but had surgery after the season to repair a stress fracture in his foot and bone spurs in his ankle.

• 2015: Landed on the DL for the first time, missing six weeks because of a calf strain and playing only 119 games (he still hit .338 to win his fourth batting title, although he hit only 18 home runs).

• 2017: Bothered by back problems all season and played 130 games, hitting .249 with 16 home runs.

• 2018: Missed time earlier because of a hamstring issue and now he’s out for the season. While he managed to hit .301 while in the lineup, he never did find his power stroke.

Cabrera is now 35 years old — turning 36 next April — with a body struggling to

Leon Halip/Getty Images

handle the rigors of playing baseball every day. There is still ability there when healthy, as witnessed by a strong 2016 season when he hit .316 with 38 home runs, but will he be able to tap into that ability in the future? The worrisome aspect for the Tigers? Cabrera’s future salaries: $30 million per season in 2019, 2020 and 2021, then $32 million per year in 2022 and 2023… and then a $30 million vesting option (or an $8 million buyout) for 2024, and a $30 million vesting option for 2025.

That’s a minimum of $162 million owed an aging superstar who probably moves to DH next season. Look, maybe Cabrera bounces back and this won’t end up as bad as the Albert Pujols contract. He’s a better hitter than Pujols, who turned into a one-dimensional slugger in his mid-30s, with declining batting averages and worsening control of the strike zone. Cabrera still had a .397 OBP, so there’s some hope he’ll age better if the body does.

Still, when Cabrera signed the extension back in March 2014 — when he still had two seasons remaining on his contract at the time — it was obviously a risky bet given the deal would, at minimum, go through Cabrera’s age-40 season. The contract was widely criticized in part because there was no need to do the contract when he was still two years away from free agency. If the Tigers had waited even one year, they would have witnessed the first signs of Cabrera’s body breaking down.

That extension came courtesy of an owner now deceased and a GM no longer here. The current regime has to work with the ramifications.

Super Nola: Aaron Nola’s ERA has been below 3.00 all season. After two abbreviated five-inning outings to begin the season, he has pitched at least six innings in each start since, which might not impress the old-timers but qualifies as a workhorse by today’s standard. He has given up more than three runs only once, and that was just four runs. He has given up only five home runs in 91 innings, despite playing his home run games in a great home run park.

Nola improved to 8-2 with a 2.27 ERA after fanning 10 in 6⅔ innings in a 5-4 victory over the Rockies on Tuesday, a game made close when Colorado rallied for three runs in the ninth. The game ended when Seranthony Dominguez fanned Nolan Arenado on a checked swing, a call that Arenado was not happy about.

Here’s Nola fanning Charlie Blackmon with his wipeout curveball:

Nola has always had the curve, but the continued improvement of his changeup has taken him to a new level. Talking about the changeup after the game on MLB Network, Nola explained it was a pitch he didn’t use much at LSU because he threw his curve so much, but he started focusing on it a lot more in spring training in 2017. Indeed, his confidence in the changeup can be seen through his usage:

2016: 8.6 percent
2017: 15.7 percent
2018: 22.4 percent

Batters are hitting .193/.245/.239 against his changeup. It has turned him into not just an obvious All-Star candidate, but a Cy Young candidate.

Defensive play of the night: Mitch Haniger with the throw, Jean Segura with the tag:

Oh, Haniger had two home runs as the Mariners beat the Angels to overcome Mike Trout’s two home runs. Although this is a pretty awesome little factoid: Trout became the first player to have consecutive multihomer games at Safeco Field — yes, no Mariner has ever done it.

Mad Max: The Max Muncy show continues as the Dodgers pounded Bartolo Colon and the Rangers:

That’s four games in a row with a home run for Muncy. His OPS is over 1.000. Baseball is amazing.

Braves slam hapless Mets: Ozzie Albies had the big blow with a grand slam to cap a six-run sixth inning as the Braves beat the Mets 8-2. This play kind of sums up the Mets’ season:

That was Johan Camargo with the D and Asdrubal Cabrera with the baserunning as the Mets lost for the ninth time in 10 games.

Keep an eye on Mike Foltynewicz, who was terrific again with five scoreless innings (no walks), but left the game because of triceps tightness. Fingers crossed.

Rest easy, J.D. Martinez, you may start the All-Star Game: The early vote leaders for the American League All-Star starters:

The closest races are at catcher, where Gary Sanchez leads Wilson Ramos, and first base, with Jose Abreu over Mitch Moreland. I thought shortstop might be closer, but Manny Machado has a 110,000-vote lead over Francisco Lindor, with Didi Gregorius and Carlos Correa a couple of thousand votes behind Lindor.

Abreu is the interesting player in a weak crop at first base. He’s really the only deserving starter, based on 2018 performance plus previous track record, unless you want to give a legacy vote to Miguel Cabrera or Albert Pujols. If he does win the vote, he’d be the first White Sox position player to start since Frank Thomas in 1995.

http://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/23776923/real-not-miguel-cabrera-never-dominate-plate-again